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Passez, muscade !

hiddeninthewood replied to your post: fucking dammit I should have ended this the last…

May the Force be with you (I’m totally freaked out about my dissertation, late again, so… I’ll mail you once I know whether I will fail or not) And I love your school already. (I now have a Fridge. And Fruits in it). Love !

Hi you <3 don’t worry for me (I’m more worried for him, really) - and accept international happyhugwaves about your dissertation!

You’re awesome, remember :)

(I got your pirate treasure! I can’t even appropriately describe it here! Ashnufgh! *pirate brofist*)


luzfosca:

Henri Cartier-BressonRome, 1959

luzfosca:

Henri Cartier-Bresson
Rome, 1959


fucking dammit I should have ended this the last time

why am I going on an awkward date instead of staying happily in my room writing to and putting together parcels for - I lack a more loving word - friends


hiddlybatch:

He reminds me of Pre-Raphaelite paintings and intricate florals and ethereal poems and gold-embroidered velvet and antique treasures from a long, long time ago…


yourfutureleader:

elmundoenllamas:

Verdun Now

French WWI trench, The ‘Forbidden Zone’, Bois-Hauts, Les Eparges, Lorraine, France. Summer 2008. Photograph by Jonathan Olley 

The ‘Forbidden Zone’, where the land undulates with bisecting shell craters. The mature beech and pine forests that cover the hills above the city of Verdun are home to some of the Great War’s most bitter fighting, as many as 150 shells fell for every square meter of this battlefield. ‘The Battle of Verdun’ as well as being the longest Battle of ‘The Great War’ also has the ignominy of being the first test of modern industrialised slaughter. Not for nothing was the battlefield of Verdun known to the soldiers who fought in it, as ‘The Mincer’, where over the entire period of the war almost a million men became casualties. Recent estimates made by The French interior Ministry state at least 12 million unexploded shells lie undiscovered in the hills overlooking the City of Verdun.

My dad works at a secondary school (though sadly not as a history teacher) and accompanied a group of students on their WWI trip to Verdun for several years. They would always take a tour through this Forbidden Zone with a local guide. Of course they would always warn the students not to pick anything up, because it’s obviously really dangerous, seeing as people still die every year when accidentally stumbling upon unexploded shells. Suddenly, this girl comes walking up to them carrying this huge shell in her arms. In a panic, someone shouts: “What are you doing? Drop that right now!” So she drops the shell.. And the fact that my dad’s still alive today is partially due to that shell not exploding or having at some point contained mustard gas. But they were all really scared, and you’d think they’d be a bit more careful picking up shells and what not around Verdun.. until you see the box in our garage containing various (empty?) shells and bullets.


#outside
elinka:
Lightning, Iran
by AmirAli Sharifi

elinka:

Lightning, Iran

by AmirAli Sharifi



A hero? Like you?

A hero? Like you?


lhomme-arme:

Gruenewald - detail from the Temptation of St. Anthony

lhomme-arme:

Gruenewald - detail from the Temptation of St. Anthony


 j.m.w. turner+horizons


coveredinsnow-:

#what do you think is going through steve’s head in this moment #”the only thing you really fight for is yourself. #you’re not the guy to make the sacrifice play. #to lay down on a wire and let the other guy crawl over you.” #or maybe he’s not thinking about anything #except for how it never hurts any less to see a fellow soldier fall

coveredinsnow-:

#what do you think is going through steve’s head in this moment #”the only thing you really fight for is yourself. #you’re not the guy to make the sacrifice play. #to lay down on a wire and let the other guy crawl over you.” #or maybe he’s not thinking about anything #except for how it never hurts any less to see a fellow soldier fall


The Spoon Theory 

redefiningbodyimage:

feministresistance:

The Spoon Theory, written by a woman living with Lupus, uses an analogy to offer some insight into what daily life with a disability or chronic illness can be like. ”The difference in being sick and being healthy is having to make choices or to consciously think about things when the rest of the world doesn’t have to. The healthy have the luxury of a life without choices, a gift most people take for granted.” [Categories include: invisible disabilities, chronic illness, personal testimonies.]

Always a good thing to reblob.


#BtVS

well

idk how to handle this one

failures from start to finish are one thing to handle

but a whole lot of positivity and goodness that ends with the sudden return of my inability to do anything and self-hate and failure is

worse


thewangandonly:

Stay curious
This shot was taken during a shoot in Maginhawa!

thewangandonly:

Stay curious

This shot was taken during a shoot in Maginhawa!